2017 Volume 18

Articles and Abstracts

Articles

Volume 18 Number 1: Pöllänen, S., & Ruotsalainen, K. (2017). Dialogue between art and craft: Textile materials and techniques in contemporary art.

The aim of this study was to investigate the ways in which textile materials and techniques are expressed in contemporary art in Finland. The first phase of data collection was to identify a population of Finnish artists who use textile craft-based forms in their art and who produce their works themselves. After that, six discretionary selected artists’ works were analyzed using essence analysis based on photographs and artists’ statements. The analysis brought out the reciprocal and complementary dialogue between art and craft, contributing to an ongoing debate about topical issues and the valuation of everyday relationships and objects. Artists are viewing their work from an artistic perspective but also basing their process in the appreciation of craft. The works of art portray mental associations with the help of craft techniques and materials. This article argues that the dialogue between art and craft helped these artists cross over borders and traditions.

Volume 18 Number 2: Sakr, M., & Kucirkova, N. (2016). Parent-child moments of meeting in art-making with collage, iPad, tuxpaint, and crayons.

The aim of this study was to investigate the ways in which textile materials and techniques are expressed in contemporary art in Finland. The first phase of data collection was to identify a population of Finnish artists who use textile craft-based forms in their art and who produce their works themselves. After that, six discretionary selected artists’ works were analyzed using essence analysis based on photographs and artists’ statements. The analysis brought out the reciprocal and complementary dialogue between art and craft, contributing to an ongoing debate about topical issues and the valuation of everyday relationships and objects. Artists are viewing their work from an artistic perspective but also basing their process in the appreciation of craft. The works of art portray mental associations with the help of craft techniques and materials. This article argues that the dialogue between art and craft helped these artists cross over borders and traditions.

Volume 18 Number 3: McFerran, K. S., Crooke, A. H. D., & Bolger, L. (2017). Promoting engagement in school through tailored music programs.

Music and arts programs have increasingly been utilized to promote school engagement. Despite the fact that school engagement and music programs can be understood in myriad ways, little attention has been paid to potential distinctions between the types of music programs that underpin engagement. This article describes an investigation of how and when different types of school engagement were promoted through participation in a range of tailored music programs in four diverse school contexts. Four types of engagement were identified, including individuals’ engagement in learning, peer engagement, connections with different members of the community, and community engagement. The characteristics of each type of program differed according to leadership approach, expectation of students, degree of student engagement, and structure. The benefits of tailoring each music program to meet the unique needs and interests of each school community are illustrated through these findings. Understandings of the relationship between music and school engagement are articulated.

Volume 18 Number 4: de Vries, P. (2017). Self-efficacy and music teaching: Five narratives.

This article examines generalist primary (elementary) school teachers’ self-efficacy in teaching music. Five teachers, each with five years teaching experience, were interviewed for the study. Using this interview data narratives were constructed for each of the five teachers. These narratives focused on what factors contributed to the level of self-efficacy each teacher experienced in teaching music. The five narratives are presented, structured using the five elements of narrative - character, setting, a problem (or problems) faced, actions taken to address the problem/s, and resolution – outlined by Ollerenshaw & Creswell (2002). Each narrative is followed by a brief discussion of the impact of the four key aspects that contribute to self-efficacy – mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological arousal.

Volume 18 Number 5: Eglinton, K., Gubrium, A., & Wexler, L. (2017). Digital storytelling as arts-inspired for engaging, understanding, and supporting indigenous youth.

In this paper we examine digital storytelling as a mode of arts-inspired inquiry: in particular we consider digital storytelling as a powerful arts-inspired approach that can help researchers, practitioners, and communities understand and support indigenous and marginalized youth. Our two-fold focus is on: (1) a digital storytelling initiative that engaged hundreds of Alaska Native youth in the production of digital stories; and, (2) on findings from a subsequent pilot study which assessed the value of analyzing the young people’s digital stories produced through this initiative, as windows into the worlds, identities, struggles and concerns of these particular youth. Overall, we aim to use the findings from this pilot study, and impressions from the young people’s digital media productions, to demonstrate the potential of digital storytelling as a transformative arts-inspired inquiry which engages young people in processes of identity making, aesthetics, and voice.

Volume 18 Number 6: Gardiner, P. (2017). Playwriting and flow: The interconnection between creativity, engagement and skill development.

Understanding, encouraging and developing creativity in the classroom is an international priority (Craft, 2011). This article outlines the findings of research into playwriting pedagogy. It interrogates the conceptual assumptions that surround teaching and learning for creativity, and how these ideas influence teacher practice and student experience. It argues that student engagement and creativity are fundamentally and reciprocally linked. To better understand how to teach and foster creativity in a classroom, teachers’ views on creativity and creative processes are explored through Csikszentmihalyi’s (2008) theory of ‘flow’ and the lessons this provides for understanding engagement. The article argues that the teachers’ views of creativity and creative processes are of fundamental importance to understanding the teaching and learning experience and that student disengagement can be addressed by increasing student’s skills and knowledge both in creativity processes and playwriting proficiency.

Volume 18 Number 7: Bates, V. C. (2017). Critical social class theory for music education.

This work of critical social theory explores how formal music education in modern capitalist societies mirrors the hierarchical, means-ends, one-dimensional structures of capitalism. So, rather than consistently or reliably empowering and emancipating children musically, school music can tend to marginalize, exploit, repress, and alienate. The paper begins with a review of critical theories of social class, with emphasis on the roots of social class in historical beliefs about sociocultural evolution. Then, after considering in general terms how social class is overtly and covertly framed in music education, this framing is discussed in more detail within extant conceptualizations of musical taste, musical performance, and musical experience.

Volume 18 Number 8: Rasmussen, B. (2017). Arts education and cultural democracy: The competing discourses.

Arts education are understood and implemented by ways of different discourses. Following critical discourse theory, discourses are part of power strategies and they predominantly fight for dominance. What this means is that certain discourses and accompanying practices of arts education may rule and others may be subordinated or neglected. A review of current Norwegian publicly funded arrangements on arts and education shows competing discourses, which seem subordinate to a dominant Eurocentric arts institutional discourse. The general use of high art ‘quality’ as a nodal point in most arrangements supports the argument. Through contemporary practices of social circus outside Europe, such as Circus du Monde, and by an exemplar project, The Circus Lab, a collaboration between Norway and Portugal, a different discourse of cultural democracy and education (formation) is seen and expressed. This discourse seems to be less visible in the European context of publicly funded arrangements, where professional training, exposition to the cultural canons and audience participation still seem to monitor the comprehension and act as discursive triggers by which policies are governed. Among the consequences are lost opportunities of collaborative practices between the competent adult and the competent child.


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The International Journal of Education & the Arts currently serves as an open access platform for scholarly dialogue. Our commitment is to the highest forms of scholarship invested in the significances of the arts in education and the education within the arts. Read more about our mission…

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